No-bake Chocolate cheesecake

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No-bake cheesecakes are great; so much easier than their baked counterparts. No eggs, no waiting for ages in front of the oven, no wobble doubt and no crack! They also look a lot smarter in my opinion.

In the video, i’m sharing my recipe for a chocolate and hazelnut cheesecake. You can easily miss out the hazelnuts to make it 100% chocolate but I like mine a bit nutty.

For 1 medium cheesecake, you’ll need:

For the base:

-150g of chocolate digestives
-50g of roasted hazelnuts
-55g of melted butter

For the filling:

-170g of melted chocolate
-120g of sugar
-2tbsp of unsweetened cocoa powder
-150ml of double cream
-250g of room temperature cream cheese
-3tbsp of praline (recipe here)

Ganache topping (optional):

-150g of chocolate
-150g of double cream

You need to start with the base.
In a food processor, pulse the hazelnuts and digestives together until you end up with almost no chunks left. Don’t pulse until you have a smooth powder as you won’t get any crunch from the hazelnuts.
Add the butter and pulse again until all incorporated.
Spread and press this mixture evenly in a springform tin.
Put the tin aside in fridge or freezer.

To start the filling, stir the cream cheese and sugar together – set aside.
Whisk the double cream until soft peaks.
Add in the cooled melted chocolate and stir.
Add the cream cheese + sugar mixture to it and stir.
Add 1-2 tbsp of water to the cocoa powder to make a paste.
Stir in the praline to loosen it up before incorporating it to the cheesecake.
Add the cocoa and praline mixture to the chocolatey cream cheese and stir until well combined. Spread this on top of the base and smooth it out as much as possible.

Store the cheesecake in the freezer for 4 hours minimum until 30min to 1 hour before serving.

You can leave the topping out but here is the method for it.

When the cheesecake has been in the freezer for 1 to 2 hours, boil the double cream and pour it on top of the chocolate, make sure the cream has stopped bubbling or your chocolate will split. Stir until the cream and chocolate are combined and pour this ganache on top of the cheesecake.

Put it back in the freezer for at least an extra 2 hours.

Enjoy!

Mylène

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White chocolate & vanilla panna cotta with honey roasted figs

For the chocolate week, I have to make something with white chocolate. As I’ve never made panna cotta, I thought it would be nice to try it.

But there was a little problem: it’s usually made with pork or beef gelatine, and I’m a vegetarian.

But that didn’t stop me. I’m too aware of veggie setting agents to let it go like that!!

So I looked in my cupboard to try and find that veggie powder gelatine I bought a couple of months ago.

I followed a recipe found on-line and replaced the gelatine with my vegetarian powder.
I wasn’t that happy with the texture of it, I think I’ve put too much setting agent so it wasn’t wobbly enough to my liking but the taste was really good.
I think the setting agent I used was very strong so I recommend to use half of what it says on the packet.

For 4 pots, you’ll need:

– 500ml of cream
– 150ml of milk
– 100g of white chocolate, chopped
– 60g of sugar
– 1 vanilla pod, scrapped
– 1 tsp of veggie setting agent, or 4 gelatine leaves, soaked

Heat the cream, milk and vanilla together.

When it’s almost boiling, remove from the heat, add all the other ingredients and stir well until everything is well melted.

Pour into individual ramequins and leave it to set for 4 hours.

panna cotta skin with vanilla seeds

You’ll also need:

– 4 figs
– 1 tbsp of honey

Before serving, roast the whole figs in the honey for 5min in a hot oven (200°C).

Take the panna cotta out of their ramequins by running a thin knife around it or run some hot water on the ramequin to make it come out.

Serve the panna cotta with one roasted fig next to it and drizzle with the ‘honey and fig syrup’.

Mylene

Chocolat chaud Parisien

I really enjoy a good hot chocolate in the evening, when it’s cold and rainy outside.
I usually do my own, with real chocolate but I’ve never tried the really thick rich hot chocolate you see in Paris or in the film ‘le chocolat’.

I was dying to try it so I looked online for some inspiration.
A lot of the recipes I saw were made with cornflour to thicken it up but I thought it was cheating a bit so tried another one.
It needs only 3 ingredients and it’s dead simple.

You can choose the thickness of your hot chocolate by just cooking it for longer.

If you have never tried the real thing, you should do it tonight!!
It’s so rich that I couldn’t finish my cup but do not worry, it’s not fattening at all, it’s just very chocolatey.

For 2 large mugfulls, you’ll need:

– 550ml of wholemilk
– 150g of very good quality chocolate (I don’t like it too strong so I made it 80% dark and 20% milk chocolate)
– half of a vanilla pod, scraped
– 1 dessertspoon of sugar (only if you want to)

Boil the milk with the scraped vanilla pod. Leave it for 10min to infuse.

Take the pod out and whisk the chocolate in until melted.
At this stage, you can choose to serve it as it is but it will be a very thin hot chocolate.

Put it back on the hob, medium heat, and whisk constantly until you get the consistency you want – It can take 5 to 20min.

Serve it as you like, with whipped cream or not.

I personally love it as it is.

Enjoy

Mylene

Eclairs au chocolat

As this week is national chocolate week, I’ve decided to post one of my favourite chocolate recipes everyday.

Today is Chocolate eclairs, or éclairs au chocolat.

If by that name, you imagine a long choux pastry filled with whipped cream and topped with chocolate icing, let me tell you, you’re making a big mistake!
The real french éclair is filled with crème pâtissière, flavoured with chocolate, coffee, vanilla… It gives that french touch you’ll never get with cream, so forget about the whipped cream, really.

In my family, we’ve never been great choux pastry lovers. My mum never used to make it so I suppose it’s why I don’t make it very often.

My first attempts weren’t quite right so I decided to try again until I got it perfect. All the recipes I tried didn’t live up to my expectations, so in the end I made a mix of two recipes and it worked perfectly.
In fact it worked so well we are going to sell them locally.

See the product page here

For the filling, I used my favourite crème pâtissière recipe, just with chocolate in.
For the icing, I found a couple of recipes but chose the one I thought would be the most like the one they use in French boulangeries.

Anyway, enough of the talking, here’s the recipe.

For 6 éclairs, you’ll need:

For the filling:

– 2 egg yolks
– 10g of cornflour
– 100g of sugar
– half a liter of milk
– 70g of chocolate, chopped

For the choux pastry:

– 2 eggs,beaten
– 70g of flour
– 60ml of water
– 65ml of milk
– 55g of butter
– 5g of sugar

For the icing:

– 50g of chocolate
– 20g of butter
– 40g of icing sugar
– 1,5 tbsp of water

The filling

Make the filling at least 2 hours before making the pastry.

Boil the milk, meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks, cornflour and sugar together until nearly white.

Carefully pour the milk, a bit at a time, onto the mixture, whisking constantly.
Put the whole thing back on the hob at a low temperature and stir for 2min or until it has thick texture
Put it aside and sprinkle with the chopped chocolate.
Leave it a minute and stir the chocolate, until totally melted.
Leave to cool in the fridge.

The pastry:

Preheat the oven to 200°C.

Boil the butter, milk, water and sugar together. Then take the pan off of the hob and stir in the flour.

Put it back on the hob to dry it out, you’ll get a ball of paste.
Take it off the hob again and whisk in a bit of the beaten egg with an electric whisk.
Then add the rest of the eggs a bit at a time. You should get a smooth glossy mixture, not too runny.

Pipe that mixture onto a baking tray, lined with baking paper. Pipe long lines of it.

Put it in the oven to bake for 10 minutes, then turn the oven up to 220°C and bake for a further 10 minutes.
Take your long choux out of the oven and leave until totally cool.
With a very thin knife, cut into the choux, make a big enough cut for the nozzle of your piping bag to fit in. Fill each one with the chilled crème pâtissière.

The icing

Start the icing by melting the chocolate. When it’s melted, add the butter and icing sugar, your pan still on the hob.
Stir until the butter is totally melted. Put it aside and stir in the water a little at a time.

Wait five minutes and then you can ice your éclairs.

Keep them in the fridge.

Enjoy!

Mylène

Holidays in Brittany

This summer, we went to visit my family in Brittany in the family house I grew up in.
We had such a lovely time all together, the weather wasn’t the best but we made up for it with a lot of time just enjoying the company of each other.

I don’t really have any recipe to share from the holiday, only ideas.

As my little sister and brother love salted caramel, they were jumping around when I told them I could make some just as good as the one they buy at the supermarket, “Before you leave, can you make 1..no 3…no 8 jars of it pleeeease?” they pleaded.

So to make them extra happy I made salted caramel ice cream as my mum has an ice cream machine.

I followed a plain vanilla ice cream recipe and added a portion of salted caramel sauce (you can find the recipe on my last post).

At the last minute some more people arrived to eat with us so my “6 servings” ice cream became a “10 servings”.
To serve my ice cream, I sprinkled some crushed shortbread and put a little curl of chocolate on it.
I think it made all the difference.

Also, we had crêpes made on a special breton pan. Nearly all the older folks in my family make them.
They make it look so easy but when I have a try, it comes out looking more like mangled lace than pancake!

It’s a tradition to have buckwheat pancake batter as a savoury and a slightly sweet wheat batter for sweet.
I’m useless at making Crêpes Bretonnes. To make them properly, you need a lot of practise.
My mum is always saying that I should buy a pan and make them in the UK. I don’t think I’ll be motivated enough to practise regularly but who knows? Maybe one day soon….

Watch this space.

Mylène

Quick & easy salted caramel sauce

I really like caramel, or toffee.
In Brittany, you can find jars of salted caramel sauce that you’ll spread on toast or use in deserts but they’re incredibly expensive. I bought one about 5 years ago but it didn’t last 5 minutes, it was sooooo good, the sort of “delicious” you could never ever be able to make yourself.

Well, now I can say that I was wrong. I made some for a macaron filling, had a teaspoon of it and it took me back 5 years ago, with that little jar.

This sauce is so good, so simple and so quick that you have to try it.

For a little pot of sauce, you’ll need:

– 70g of sugar

– 65g of cream (single or double, it doesn’t matter)

– 20g of butter

Heat the sugar in a pan (on its own). Don’t stir it!

When the sugar takes a nice golden color, pour the cream and stir briskly. There is a big possibility that it’s going to splash so don’t allow any children near you while you’re doing it.
To avoid splashing, you can use a tall pan.

When the mixture stops bubbling, add the butter in little cubes.

While it’s hot, the sauce will be quite runny but when it cools down in the fridge, it will set and have the consistency of set honey.

If you like it more runny, simply add more cream to the recipe.

Enjoy!

Mylène

French butter cream that will change your life…

I’ve never been a great fan of butter cream; I thought it was heavy and much too buttery and fatty. I came to England and noticed that the british style butter cream was basically sweet butter mix.

I didn’t like butter cream until I tried a recipe seen in one of my supergreat book. I promise you, It will change your birthday cakes into something really amazing.
The texture is light, fluffy, and you have a really delicate taste of butter… Heaven!

For a dose of butter cream, you’ll need:

– 3 egg yolks

– 75g of sugar

– 30ml of water

– 150g of soft butter

– A vanilla pod, or any flavor you want to give (melted chocolate, raspberry coulis,…)

Heat the sugar and water together, leave it to boil for about 3 min, my original recipe says 5 min but if you overdo it, the sugar is going to ruin your mix, so it’s better to underdo it a tiny bit.

Meanwhile, whisk the egg yolks until they’re nearly white.

When the sugar’s ready, pour it slowly on the egg yolks, still whisking. Keep whisking until the mixture cools down. Put the soft butter in the mixture and whisk until you end up with a lovely buttery texture.

Add your flavor and mix!

It takes a tiny bit more time than British butter cream but it is totally worth it. My sister always hated butter cream until she tried mine so trust me and try that wonderful recipe as soon as you can.
I’m maybe a bit too passionate about it but if you want to change your (baking) life, French butter cream will do it for sure!!!!!!!

Mylene