Frozen yoghurt recipe

Since about a month, I’ve been obsessing over frozen yoghurt. I tried it in the new year for the first time (shop bought, not the soft scoop ones) and loved it straight away.
It’s become a habit in the evening in front of a film to have a bit of frozen yoghurt as dessert. Of course I had to try it myself and it was a success.

Now I make a batch once a week, it doesn’t cost much and it’s a very easy thing to do, you only need 2 to 3 ingredients but an ice cream machine is vital.

You’ll need to use natural bio-live yoghurt, I started to buy these 1kg tubs, perfect for a weekly batch. I’ve never used greek style yoghurt as I heard it was too rich and creamy to use for frozen yoghurt.

I like it with fruits, it’s very fresh and tasty. You can use pretty much any fruits you like.
So far I’ve used mixed berries (bought frozen, best quality and cheap), strawberries, passion fruits and mango.
All you need to do is blend or juice the fruits into smooth purée or juice. I never measure how much fruit I put in, I just eye it.
To give you a rough idea, I used a whole mango for 1kg of yoghurt and for the passion fruit one, I used the juice of 6 fresh passion fruits…
You can also use other flavours like chocolate, vanilla, caramel… but I haven’t tried it yet so I can’t really give you advice on it.

The frozen yoghurts I made had different results, the strawberry one tasted just like ice cream while the other ones had a strong yoghurt taste.

To sweeten the yoghurt, I use 3/4 cup to 1 cup of sugar per kg of yoghurt depending on what type of fruit I use. The sweeter the fruits, the less sugar you’ll need to add.

To store it, I use used tubs of 500g of yoghurt, it fits nicely in the freezer.
It freezes pretty hard but not completely solid so if you want to scoop it out, take the yoghurt out of the freezer 20 min before serving. I honestly don’t mind it hard as I eat it out of the tub (should I really share this information?) but I would if I was going to serve it to other people.

For 2.5 tubs:

– 1kg of bio live natural yoghurt
– 1 cup of sugar
– fruit puree or juice

Pour the yoghurt in a large bowl and add the sugar.

Stir and let it sit until the sugar has dissolved, around 2 mins.

Add the fruit purée and stir until well combined.

Pour the mixture into an ice cream maker and let it churn for 30 min.

Spoon the frozen mixture into containers. Freeze and eat whenever!

(Sort of) Chelsea buns

Like a lot of people, I watched this year’s series of The Great British bake off.

One of the last recipes shown was the Chelsea bun. I never tried that kind of buns before so I decided to give it a go.

I read the complete recipe before I made it. (I didn’t really know if I had all the ingredients for the filling but thought it would be ok anyway) so when I had to prepare the filling, I read: dried apricots, raisins, dried cranberries, I realized I only had the raisins… I also didn’t have apricot jam to glaze them.
Actually, I had but when I opened the jar, it did the “fizzzzz” , like when you open a bottle of lemonade, so I wisely decided not the use it.

So I changed the apricots into dates, the cranberries into pecan nuts (my ultimate favourite) and the apricot jam into cherry jam.
I didn’t really fancy the icing on the top so I decided to go without it.

At the end, I was really happy I changed the recipe. The nuts give something else to the bun, the cherry jam makes them look so good.
Anyway, here’s the recipe.

For 12 buns, you’ll need:

– 500g strong white flour, plus extra for dusting
– 1 tsp salt
– 7g of fast-acting yeast
– 300ml of milk
– 40g of butter, plus extra for greasing the tin
– 1 free-range egg
– 40g of sugar

For the filling:

– 30g of butter
– 75g of sugar
– 2tsp of cinnamon
– 100g of raisins
– 100g of pecans
– 100g of chopped dates

For the glaze:

– 1 tblsp of cherry jam, melted

Start by making the dough with all the ingredients, knead it for 5 to 10 min until elastic and smooth.

Leave it to rise in a warm place, uncovered for 1 hour.

After rising, put the dough back on the worktop, roll it out to get a big rectangle in front of you (about 40cm by 30cm).
Stick the end in front of you to the worktop by pushing it on it, this will make it easier to roll the buns.

Spread the butter on your rectangle, then the sugar and cinnamon and then your fruits and nuts. Press gently on them to make it stick to the dough.

Start to roll out that “sheet” towards you, you have to do it quite tight. You should end up with a big sausage like dough.

Cut that into 12 portions, and lay them on a baking tray, lined with baking paper and buttered. The buns shouldn’t touch each other yet.

Leave it for at least an other hour to rise. After that hour, the buns should start to join.

Bake for 25min, 200°C or until golden brown.

Brush each bun with the warm jam.

Eat warm or cold.

Mylène

Pain perdu or amazing French toast

If you’ve got a loaf that you forgot in your bread bin since a week which turned out hard and inedible, do not throw it away!! I have the perfect recipe which is going to bring it to life again.

Pain perdu means “lost bread” in French. It’s basically the bread you didn’t eat during the week, which is good to throw in the bin, which is “lost”. There are a few different recipes, each family have their own. It’s such a good recipe for a family snack on lazy Sunday afternoons. Everybody loves it.

For 4 hungry people, you’ll need:

– An old loaf of bread (it works with fresh bread but not as well)
– 4 egg yolks (you can use the whole egg if you don’t know what to do with the left over whites, just whisk them very very well with an electric mixer otherwise you’ll have horrible blobs of egg white in your lovely bread)
– 400ml of warm milk
– 2 tablespoons of sugar (vanilla sugar is best)+ extra to sprinkle your toast after frying
– A knob a butter
– 3 to 5 tablespoons of sunflower oil

Slice your loaf in thick slices. They may be too long, if it’s the case, cut them in half.

Whisk the egg yolks and sugar together then pour the worm milk and mix.

Put your butter and oil in a frying pan. While your butter is melting, soak your slices of bread in the milk mixture.

If your bread is really hard, you may need to soak it for quite a while. I personally like it not too soaked because there is a risk of it being soggy.

Make sure your bred is soaked but not dripping and fry it in the hot butter and oil.

Turn it over when the side is golden brown.

When the toast are ready, sprinkle with sugar.

Eat warm!

Mylène

Mother’s day!!

As you all know, it was mother’s day last Sunday. In France, mother’s day is in June so I didn’t send anything to my mum (I just phoned her to say “happy British mother’s day!!”). Even if I didn’t plan anything for her, I thought about my mother-in-law. I knew that my boyfriend wouldn’t give anything special to her, just a card and a big hug.

Obviously I was wrong because a few days before mother’s day, he asked me to help him make a cake as a present! We had a think about it and decided to make a big version of a fruity macaroon.

We made normal macaroon batter, shaped big shells and cooked them for about 30mins. We then prepared a French style raspberry butter cream and spread it on one of the shell, topped it with mashed strawberries and placed sliced strawberries all around the edges.

My boyfriend’s brother made a starter and a main course so we had a whole meal ready for Sunday evening.

Everything was lovely; the macaroon was just amazing, very fruity, mum in law even had a second slice (but don’t tell anybody)!!

Mylène