recipe blog


No-bake Chocolate cheesecake

Video link

No-bake cheesecakes are great; so much easier than their baked counterparts. No eggs, no waiting for ages in front of the oven, no wobble doubt and no crack! They also look a lot smarter in my opinion.

In the video, i’m sharing my recipe for a chocolate and hazelnut cheesecake. You can easily miss out the hazelnuts to make it 100% chocolate but I like mine a bit nutty.

For 1 medium cheesecake, you’ll need:

For the base:

-150g of chocolate digestives
-50g of roasted hazelnuts
-55g of melted butter

For the filling:

-170g of melted chocolate
-120g of sugar
-2tbsp of unsweetened cocoa powder
-150ml of double cream
-250g of room temperature cream cheese
-3tbsp of praline (recipe here)

Ganache topping (optional):

-150g of chocolate
-150g of double cream

You need to start with the base.
In a food processor, pulse the hazelnuts and digestives together until you end up with almost no chunks left. Don’t pulse until you have a smooth powder as you won’t get any crunch from the hazelnuts.
Add the butter and pulse again until all incorporated.
Spread and press this mixture evenly in a springform tin.
Put the tin aside in fridge or freezer.

To start the filling, stir the cream cheese and sugar together – set aside.
Whisk the double cream until soft peaks.
Add in the cooled melted chocolate and stir.
Add the cream cheese + sugar mixture to it and stir.
Add 1-2 tbsp of water to the cocoa powder to make a paste.
Stir in the praline to loosen it up before incorporating it to the cheesecake.
Add the cocoa and praline mixture to the chocolatey cream cheese and stir until well combined. Spread this on top of the base and smooth it out as much as possible.

Store the cheesecake in the freezer for 4 hours minimum until 30min to 1 hour before serving.

You can leave the topping out but here is the method for it.

When the cheesecake has been in the freezer for 1 to 2 hours, boil the double cream and pour it on top of the chocolate, make sure the cream has stopped bubbling or your chocolate will split. Stir until the cream and chocolate are combined and pour this ganache on top of the cheesecake.

Put it back in the freezer for at least an extra 2 hours.

Enjoy!

Mylène

Video link

Amaretti biscuits recipe

Video link

I’ve got a couple of recipes for amaretti biscuits and this is one of them. It is gluten, wheat and dairy free. It’s such an easy recipe that uses only a handful of ingredients and is absolutely delicious. If you like marzipan, you’ll love this! The finished biscuit is crisp and slightly crumbly on the outside and soft, with a lovely almond flavour in the inside.

For about 20 biscuits:

– 200g of ground almond
– 150g of icing sugar
– 1 egg white
– 1tsp of almond extract (or more according to taste)
– 1tbsp of amaretto
– icing sugar to dust

Sift the ground almond and icing sugar together to break any lumps.

Add the egg white, almond extract and amaretto. Stir until combined.

Using a small sorbet scoop, scoop balls of the dough and space them on a baking sheet lined with baking paper.

Pinch each ball of dough, this can be sticky so dipping your fingers in icing sugar in between each ball might be helpful.

Bake at 180°C for 15 minutes.

Dust with icing sugar.

Enjoy!

Mylène

Video link

DIY Gift: Festive mini-meringues

Video link

It’s that time of year again… The time when we’re all trying to find original gifts before Christmas. Instead of giving someone yet another box of chocolates, making your own gift is going to be cheaper and also so much more appreciated.

These meringues make a great little treat bag, use a fancy label and some twine or raffia to tie them with and they’ll really look the part.

For approximately 40 mini meringues

– 70g of egg whites (about 2 egg whites)
– 70g of caster or granulated sugar
– 70g of icing sugar
– flavours to your choice (peppermint extract, chocolate, spices, citrus, nuts…)
– food colouring (optional)

Preheat your oven at 100C.

Whisk the egg white and slowly add your regular sugar.
Whisk until firm and until all the sugar has desolved.

Sieve the icing sugar and add it to the egg white mixture. Gently fold until well combined.

Divide your mixture into as many parts as you want different flavours.

Try not to overload your mixture, a little flavouring goes a long way.
You can use freeze dried fruit powders and natural extract to give a strong flavour to your meringues.
You can add zest but make sure not to put too much in.

Do not add melted chocolate or watery ingredients (juices,…) to your mixture, it will not work out.

If you want to flavour them with chocolate, use a bit of cocoa powder or dip them in chocolate once baked.
You can add finely chopped nuts but not too much, it’s better to sprinkle them with nuts once they are piped.

Once you’ve decided which flavours you want add them to your mixture and fold in.

If you are using food colouring, one nice effect is to make a colourful line in your piping bag using gel paste colouring and a paintbrush and brush a line or two along the length of the piping bag.

Transfer the meringue mixture into a piping bag. You can use a nozzle but it’s optional.

Pipe the meringues on trays lined with baking paper. Pipe them however small or big you want them, they shouldn’t expand too much during baking so you can space them fairly tight.

Put the trays in the preheated oven. Meringues are very fussy with oven temperatures, if your oven is known for being hotter than it says, leave it a tiny bit open (use a wooden spoon in the door so the oven won’t shut properly). If the meringues start to crack, lower your oven temperature immediately. If you know your oven is too hot and that the meringues crack every time, don’t worry, they’ll still look gorgeous, they’ll just be a little bit more home made looking.

Leave the meringues to bake for 30-40 min or until you can pick one up and no traces of unbaked meringue are left on the tray. They should be crisp to the touch and handle a poke with a fingernail without cracking (I know, very scientific…). They’ll be lovely and soft inside. If you want them crisp all the way, they’ll need an extra 15 min of baking.

Leave them to cool down completely before devouring or wrapping!

Mylène

Video link

Gluten free chocolate cake

Video link

I’m not gluten intolerant but I’m always trying new recipes and the other day, I had a tin of chestnut purée to use up so this recipe came about.

I find that this cake is a mixture of opposites : it’s dense but light, intense but delicate.
It’s dense because there’s no flour to support it. It’s light because of all the egg whites in it. It’s delicate in one bite but becomes intense after a whole slice. Needless to say that I love this cake.

Even if you’re not on a gluten free diet, give it a go, it might surprise you.

For a large cake, you’ll need:

– 225g of melted chocolate
– 125g of soft butter
– 70g of white sugar
– 6 eggs, separated
– 1 tin of chestnut puree

Preheat the oven at 180 degrees.

Whisk the egg whites until stiff. Put aside.

Whisk the butter with the sugar until pale.

Gradually add the egg yolks.

Whisk in the chestnut purée and then the melted chocolate.

Add a small amount of egg white and fold it in. Add the rest of the egg whites and fold until incorporated.

Pour the mixture into a lined cake tin with a removable bottom.

Bake for 1 hour.

The cake should be risen but still slightly wobbly in the middle. Leave to cool completely before serving.

Enjoy!

Mylène

Video link

nutty oaty cookies

Video link

This recipe is one I use all the time. I spent quite a while trying to find the perfect cookie recipe (don’t we all…) and I’m pretty positive I’ve found the best: chocolate chip, oat & nut and also triple chocolate cookies. I’m keeping the other 2 for other blog posts but today I’ll share with you my oat, chocolate, raisin & nut cookie recipe.

Warning for this recipe: do not over bake!!!!
Even if the cookies look like they are underdone, if you wait until they are completely golden brown, they’ll be as hard as brick.

A tip for lazy cooks: I usually make a full batch of these and freeze most of them.
That way when you really can’t be bothered with cooking pudding one night, just bang a few in the oven and you’re done!

To freeze them, you’ll need to make balls with the dough on a tray and put the whole tray in the freezer. After about 1 hour, the dough balls will be stiff enough to be stored in a freezer bag without sticking to each other!

For 30-35 cookies, you’ll need:

– 125g of butter
– 100g of dark brown sugar
– 100g of white sugar
– 1 egg
– 200g of self raising flour
– 60g of rolled oats
– 100g of good quality dark chocolate chips
– 100g of raisins
– 100g of walnuts or whatever you have in your cupboard, roughly chopped

Cream butter and sugars together until lighter in colour and fluffy

Add the egg.

Stir in the flour and the oats.
Before the flour is completely combined, add the chocolate, raisins and nuts. Don’t over mix the dough.

Make small dollops with the dough (or even better, use an ice cream scoop), space them on a tray lined with baking paper and bake for 10 min at 180 degrees or until golden on the edges but still pale in the middle.

Once they are out of the oven, leave them to cool for at least 10 min as they’ll still be very soft and won’t be able to be handled. You need patience, a lot of it to stop yourself from munching on the hot cookies!

Enjoy!

Video link

Mylène

Bakewell Tart

Video link

This week, I’m sharing with you a video recipe! Yay!! This bakewell tart used to be my number 1 favourite when I was about 16. My gran made it once and gave me her recipe, I thought the sweet jam (she used apricot, a LOT of it) with fragranced almonds and earthy pine nuts was the absolute perfect combination.

I hadn’t made it for years so when I bit into the one I made for the video, it took me way back. I used damson jam instead which was a really good alternative, less sweet than apricot & more fruity.

Regarding the filling, as I didn’t have the original recipe, I looked around the internet for regular bakewell tarts but was unsatisfied with all of them (too little egg, too much sugar, flour???) so I made up my own. To me, the pine nuts are essential as they really take the tart to a whole new level. They balance out the sweetness that can sometimes be overwhelming.

Ingredients (for 6-8 people)

– 120g of ground almonds
– 120g of sugar
– 120g of soft butter
– 75g of pine nuts
– 2 small eggs
– half a lemon zest
– 1.5-2 tbsp of jam, damson or raspberry are best
– a pastry case, 20cm, already blind baked (see my pate sablee recipe)

Preheat oven at 180 degrees.

Cream the butter and sugar together until pale and fluffy. Add the eggs one by one. Add the ground almonds and lemon zest. Add 50g of pine nuts, keep the remaining 25g for decoration.
Spread the jam onto the pastry. Spread the almond mix on top of the jam. Sprinkle with the remaining 25g of pine nuts.

Bake for about 35min or until the middle of the tart doesn’t wobble.

Leave to cool completely or eat it slightly warm.

Video link

Mylène

Frozen yoghurt recipe

Since about a month, I’ve been obsessing over frozen yoghurt. I tried it in the new year for the first time (shop bought, not the soft scoop ones) and loved it straight away.
It’s become a habit in the evening in front of a film to have a bit of frozen yoghurt as dessert. Of course I had to try it myself and it was a success.

Now I make a batch once a week, it doesn’t cost much and it’s a very easy thing to do, you only need 2 to 3 ingredients but an ice cream machine is vital.

You’ll need to use natural bio-live yoghurt, I started to buy these 1kg tubs, perfect for a weekly batch. I’ve never used greek style yoghurt as I heard it was too rich and creamy to use for frozen yoghurt.

I like it with fruits, it’s very fresh and tasty. You can use pretty much any fruits you like.
So far I’ve used mixed berries (bought frozen, best quality and cheap), strawberries, passion fruits and mango.
All you need to do is blend or juice the fruits into smooth purée or juice. I never measure how much fruit I put in, I just eye it.
To give you a rough idea, I used a whole mango for 1kg of yoghurt and for the passion fruit one, I used the juice of 6 fresh passion fruits…
You can also use other flavours like chocolate, vanilla, caramel… but I haven’t tried it yet so I can’t really give you advice on it.

The frozen yoghurts I made had different results, the strawberry one tasted just like ice cream while the other ones had a strong yoghurt taste.

To sweeten the yoghurt, I use 3/4 cup to 1 cup of sugar per kg of yoghurt depending on what type of fruit I use. The sweeter the fruits, the less sugar you’ll need to add.

To store it, I use used tubs of 500g of yoghurt, it fits nicely in the freezer.
It freezes pretty hard but not completely solid so if you want to scoop it out, take the yoghurt out of the freezer 20 min before serving. I honestly don’t mind it hard as I eat it out of the tub (should I really share this information?) but I would if I was going to serve it to other people.

For 2.5 tubs:

– 1kg of bio live natural yoghurt
– 1 cup of sugar
– fruit puree or juice

Pour the yoghurt in a large bowl and add the sugar.

Stir and let it sit until the sugar has dissolved, around 2 mins.

Add the fruit purée and stir until well combined.

Pour the mixture into an ice cream maker and let it churn for 30 min.

Spoon the frozen mixture into containers. Freeze and eat whenever!

Mystère

It’s been a while since my last blog post, over a year, I know! Once again, it’s a “recreation” recipe.

Mystère is an ice cream dessert that you buy in supermarkets in France. I used to love them so much when I was little, but I didn’t get to eat so many as I think they were quite pricey.
Somehow, recently I thought about it and wondered if I could pull it off.

The Mystère is a meringue covered with a thick layer of vanilla ice cream then smothered in sweet hazelnuts.
It’s one of the easiest impressive desserts ever. You don’t have to make all the ingredients from scratch if you don’t have time or don’t have the equipment. However, homemade ice cream really takes it to the next level.

I made the ice cream myself so I can’t really say how much there was but probably around half a tub of shop bought ice cream.

For 4-6 Mysteres you’ll need:

– 1 tub of vanilla ice cream
– 4-6 mini meringues
– 100g of dark chocolate (optional)
– 100g of sugar
– 100g of roasted hazelnuts

First, you’ll need to make a praline by heating the sugar in a saucepan, on its own until nice and golden-brown.

Immediately add the hazelnuts and stir them in.

Empty the saucepan onto a tray lined with baking paper.

Leave until completely cooled.

When the nuts are cooled down, roughly break them apart and pulse them in your food processor or grinder until you have a rough powder. You don’t want it too fine, small chunks add texture.

Melt the chocolate and, with a pastry brush, brush it on the meringues. You could dip them in but it’s going to be a lot of chocolate, probably too much. This step is optional but will ensure that the meringues don’t get soggy in the ice cream.

Line small ramequins with cling film and fill them 3/4 of the way with soft ice cream.

Take your meringue (the chocolate should be set) and press it gently into the ice cream until everything is level.

Leave to set in the freezer for a couple of hours.

When the ice cream is set, take it out of the ramequin and roll it into the praline. The whole thing should be completely covered.

You can serve them straight away or store them in the freezer until you need them.

Enjoy!

Mylene

Traditional tiramisu

Video link

This is definitly a favourite of our household. It never lasts very long and is enjoyed with lots of “mmmhhhh” and “thish ish sho delishous”.

The recipe is traditional but I added my own little touches.

Some notes…

Regarding the use of raw eggs, the subject seems to be very controversial but I honestly don’t mind. These days, raw egg related diseases are almost non-existent so… it’s up to you if you feel comfortable with eating uncooked eggs.

If you don’t have amaretto, don’t panic, you can replace it with rum or other alcohol. Just think if the alcohol you have would work with the flavours of the tiramisu, or if you’re in doubt, just leave it out altogether.

I’ve seen some people “soaking” the sponge fingers for only 1-2 seconds.
If you like your tiramisu very mild and the biscuits to be still quite chewy, then don’t soak them for very long. I personally prefer to soak them for longer but that’s just me!

Anyway, here’s the recipe.

For about 5 servings, you’ll need:

– 3 eggs
– 250g (1 tub) of mascarpone
– 100g of sugar
– 1 bowl of very strong coffee
– 1 tbsp of cocoa powder + 2 more for dusting
– 3 tbsp of amaretto
– 1 packet of sponge fingers
– vanilla extract (optional)

First, make the coffee and stir in the cocoa powder and amaretto. The cocoa powder might sink at the bottom of the bowl so make sure you stir it often.

Separate the eggs yolks from the egg whites. Whisk the egg whites with half of the sugar until firm.

Whisk the egg yolks with the rest of the sugar until pale and creamy. Add the room temperature mascarpone and whisk until smooth.
Add a little bit of the egg whites to the egg yolks-mascarpone and fold it in. Then add the rest of the egg whites in one go. If you’re using vanilla extract, add it now.

layers

Soak half of the sponge fingers in the coffee and lay them on the bottom of your dish.
Depending on how strong you like the tiramisu, you can soak them a tiny bit of leave them until soft. Add half of the creamy mixture and then repeat the layers one more time.

Leave in the fridge for at least 3h. Before serving, dust with coca powder.

If you’re going to make double, you can double the layers too.

smoothing

YouTube video link

Mylène

Pecan biscuits

I know, it’s been a while (or should I say ages) since my last blog post.
I’ve been so busy in the last couple of months, I didn’t have any time to write. The other reason is that I’m always quite strict about the sort of recipes that I share, they have to be really good ones that I love, not just some random stuff that I thought was ok.

I have been baking a lot since my last post but none of the stuff I made blew my mind. Until… The pecan biscuits.

I’ve had a bit of a love/hate relationship with pecan nuts. I seem to have a massive ideal in my mind about how they’re going to taste like, mainly because when I was a teenager, I wasn’t really allowed to buy any because they’re so expensive.
They became a sort of luxury baking product to me. The thing is that my “pecan bakes” never taste as good as I thought they would. Until…

The pecan biscuits recipe:

For about 15 biscuits/cookies, you’ll need:

– 115g of butter
– 75g of sugar
– 130g of plain flour
– 100g of finely chopped pecan nuts

Cream butter and sugar together until light and pale. Add the flour and nuts.

Refrigirate for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven at 170C.

Shape balls with the dough and place on your baking sheet or tray, lined with baking paper.

Bake for about 15 minutes until the base of the biscuit starts to go brown.

You could eat them as they are or roll them in icing sugar.

Wait until cool before eating.

They’re really buttery and subtly nutty. Very crumbly too. I would say quite similar to a shortbread but 10 times better.

Mylène