Malt loaf

I had my first malt loaf about 3 years ago. We don’t have them in France so it was a new thing to try.

I really like it but I’m not a malt loaf addict like I know some people are.
I knew it was time for me to have a go at it, how hard could it be? Well… finding malt extract was quite a long process, I couldn’t find any in supermarkets so headed to my local whole-food shop.
If I understand right, malt extract used to be a sort of horrid supplement that kids use to be obligated to eat (Winnie the Pooh reference there!).

I couldn’t help myself from opening the jar in the car on the way home just to see what the fuss was about. To me, it smells and taste like maltesers, it’s quite nice just to eat it on it’s own.

Don’t expect a malt loaf you might make to be exactly like the commercial ones because they’re not. Mine wasn’t as stodgy and sticky.
After making a malt loaf, you should keep it airtight in a plastic bag for a couple of days to make it go a bit more sticky.

malt

For 2 loaves you’ll need:

– 150ml of hot tea
– 2 eggs
– 85g of brown sugar
– 150g of malt extract
– 25g of black treacle
– 250g of plain flour
– 1tsp of baking powder
– half a tsp of bicarbonate of soda
– 300g of raisins

Preheat your oven at 150C.

Line 2 loaf tins with baking paper.

Pour the malt extract, treacle, sugar and raisins in the hot tea and stir well!

Add the eggs, flour, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda to the mixture.

Pour the batter in the prepared tins and bake for 50 minutes.

That’s it.

The usual way to eat it is in slices with butter. Toasted it is also very good.

Mylène

(Sort of) Chelsea buns

Like a lot of people, I watched this year’s series of The Great British bake off.

One of the last recipes shown was the Chelsea bun. I never tried that kind of buns before so I decided to give it a go.

I read the complete recipe before I made it. (I didn’t really know if I had all the ingredients for the filling but thought it would be ok anyway) so when I had to prepare the filling, I read: dried apricots, raisins, dried cranberries, I realized I only had the raisins… I also didn’t have apricot jam to glaze them.
Actually, I had but when I opened the jar, it did the “fizzzzz” , like when you open a bottle of lemonade, so I wisely decided not the use it.

So I changed the apricots into dates, the cranberries into pecan nuts (my ultimate favourite) and the apricot jam into cherry jam.
I didn’t really fancy the icing on the top so I decided to go without it.

At the end, I was really happy I changed the recipe. The nuts give something else to the bun, the cherry jam makes them look so good.
Anyway, here’s the recipe.

For 12 buns, you’ll need:

– 500g strong white flour, plus extra for dusting
– 1 tsp salt
– 7g of fast-acting yeast
– 300ml of milk
– 40g of butter, plus extra for greasing the tin
– 1 free-range egg
– 40g of sugar

For the filling:

– 30g of butter
– 75g of sugar
– 2tsp of cinnamon
– 100g of raisins
– 100g of pecans
– 100g of chopped dates

For the glaze:

– 1 tblsp of cherry jam, melted

Start by making the dough with all the ingredients, knead it for 5 to 10 min until elastic and smooth.

Leave it to rise in a warm place, uncovered for 1 hour.

After rising, put the dough back on the worktop, roll it out to get a big rectangle in front of you (about 40cm by 30cm).
Stick the end in front of you to the worktop by pushing it on it, this will make it easier to roll the buns.

Spread the butter on your rectangle, then the sugar and cinnamon and then your fruits and nuts. Press gently on them to make it stick to the dough.

Start to roll out that “sheet” towards you, you have to do it quite tight. You should end up with a big sausage like dough.

Cut that into 12 portions, and lay them on a baking tray, lined with baking paper and buttered. The buns shouldn’t touch each other yet.

Leave it for at least an other hour to rise. After that hour, the buns should start to join.

Bake for 25min, 200°C or until golden brown.

Brush each bun with the warm jam.

Eat warm or cold.

Mylène

Chocolate tiffin

For my second chocolate recipe, I chose to make tiffins.

I love chocolate on its own, it’s such a good feeling to bite into a bar of chocolate but things made with chocolate, especially cakes, make me feel a bit sick.

Like all my dad’s family, I have a very slight allergy to cocoa, I sneeze when I eat something very strong in cocoa.

It’s not too bad as I don’t really enjoy the bitterness of a very dark bar of chocolate but you get that bitterness too often in chocolate cakes, mousses, ice cream…

I suppose it’s why I don’t really like them.

So these tiffins…
I made them with very good quality milk chocolate as I didn’t want them to be too high in cocoa content.

For 20 tiffins, you’ll need:

– 400g of biscuits of your choice, crushed (I used ginger biscuits, but I don’t think they worked as well as digestives or shortbreads would have)
– 200g of butter
– 140g of golden syrup
– 150g of mixed roasted nuts (almonds and hazelnuts are good)
– 30g of cocoa
– 70g of raisins
– 300g of milk chocolate

Mix the crushed biscuits, nuts, cocoa and raisins together.

Melt the butter and golden syrup together, pour it on the biscuit mixture and mix.

Lay a tin with baking paper and pour the mixture in.
Press it until you have a levelled base for your tiffins.

Chill for at least 1 hour.

Melt your chocolate, pour it on the biscuit base, then wait for the chocolate to set a little bit (20min) and run a knife on it to create paterns.

Enjoy

Mylene