Traditional tiramisu

Video link

This is definitly a favourite of our household. It never lasts very long and is enjoyed with lots of “mmmhhhh” and “thish ish sho delishous”.

The recipe is traditional but I added my own little touches.

Some notes…

Regarding the use of raw eggs, the subject seems to be very controversial but I honestly don’t mind. These days, raw egg related diseases are almost non-existent so… it’s up to you if you feel comfortable with eating uncooked eggs.

If you don’t have amaretto, don’t panic, you can replace it with rum or other alcohol. Just think if the alcohol you have would work with the flavours of the tiramisu, or if you’re in doubt, just leave it out altogether.

I’ve seen some people “soaking” the sponge fingers for only 1-2 seconds.
If you like your tiramisu very mild and the biscuits to be still quite chewy, then don’t soak them for very long. I personally prefer to soak them for longer but that’s just me!

Anyway, here’s the recipe.

For about 5 servings, you’ll need:

– 3 eggs
– 250g (1 tub) of mascarpone
– 100g of sugar
– 1 bowl of very strong coffee
– 1 tbsp of cocoa powder + 2 more for dusting
– 3 tbsp of amaretto
– 1 packet of sponge fingers
– vanilla extract (optional)

First, make the coffee and stir in the cocoa powder and amaretto. The cocoa powder might sink at the bottom of the bowl so make sure you stir it often.

Separate the eggs yolks from the egg whites. Whisk the egg whites with half of the sugar until firm.

Whisk the egg yolks with the rest of the sugar until pale and creamy. Add the room temperature mascarpone and whisk until smooth.
Add a little bit of the egg whites to the egg yolks-mascarpone and fold it in. Then add the rest of the egg whites in one go. If you’re using vanilla extract, add it now.

layers

Soak half of the sponge fingers in the coffee and lay them on the bottom of your dish.
Depending on how strong you like the tiramisu, you can soak them a tiny bit of leave them until soft. Add half of the creamy mixture and then repeat the layers one more time.

Leave in the fridge for at least 3h. Before serving, dust with coca powder.

If you’re going to make double, you can double the layers too.

smoothing

YouTube video link

Mylène

Galette des Rois

Like every early January, I’m going to make a Galette des Rois. It’s a tradition in France; it’s supposed to celebrate a religious moment (epiphany) but for most people, it’s just an old family tradition. It’s a pie filled up with frangipane (or something else) and covered with pastry.

The whole excitement about it is that there is a “fève”, a little character made of porcelain, hidden in it.  You cut the galette and ask the youngest child to go under the table (I know, it’s weird) and he’s going to choose who’s having what piece without seeing.

The one who’s got the fève is the king or the queen of the day and can choose his queen or her king.

In medieval time, the (real) king and nobles used to choose an 8 year old boy with no money to be the king for the day; the boy could eat what he wanted and had servants all day. Each person in the court gave money for the boy to be able to go to school.

Anyway, enough of the mythology, here’s the recipe.

You’ll need:

–  2 circles of puff pastry
–  150g of ground almonds
–  100g of sugar
–  2 eggs
–  100g of melted butter
–  1 egg yolk, for brushing

The almond mix – Mix the almonds, sugar, eggs and butter together (for mine I also added 1 tablespoon of pistachio paste).

Put one circle of puff pastry on a baking tray, brush the edges with water.

Spread the frangipane (almond mix) but stop at about 3cm from the edge.

Put the fève randomly on the frangipane and place the second circle of pastry on the first.

Stick the edges together as much as you can then brush the pastry with egg yolk.

Finish by drawing a nice pattern with the top of a knife. Put in the oven on 180°C for about 25 minutes or until golden.

Mylène